New Orleans Garden Design

New Orleans Garden Design

Award Winning LandscapesMatthew Ponseti earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Spring Hill College in Mobile, Alabama. He is licensed as a Horticulturist, Landscape Contractor, and Arborist and in Ornamental and Turf Management. Ponseti Landscaping specializes in serving the New Orleans Uptown, Lakeview and Old Metairie neighborhoods.Ponseti Landscaping designs and installs gardens, lighting systems, and irrigation, along with hardscapes and sub-surface drainage. Many landscape companies can design a basic landscape, but Matthew Ponseti goes a step beyond. Ponseti works with clients to create a unique design that will create a cohesive relationship between the home and the garden. Ponseti Landscaping has been designing residential and commercial gardens for over 20 years in Uptown New Orleans, Lakeview, and Old Metairie.We take pleasure in enhancing the unique southern beauty of our native city, New Orleans. We are passionate to bring colorful gardens and the smells of life to New Orleans. We seek to foster a mentality where one can stop and smell the roses, the gardenias, and marvel at beautiful front yards.Our cultural ethics tell you more about Ponseti Landscaping than all of the expertise we have gathered over the past two decades of experience with local plants and people. A skilled landscaper knows his trade and tools, but we like to think of our genuine southern garden designs as art… Art deeply entwined with the soul of New Orleans.A Letter from Matthew PonsetiHello everyone. Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to talk to you today about my profession. I’ve been working in the landscaping industry for 22 years now, and it has become something I’m very passionate about. I’ve been able to channel my love for the arts into creating designs that bring out the beauty of our city and its unique homes.At Ponseti Landscaping, we focus on designing and maintaining residential and commercial gardens in Uptown, Lakeview, and Old Metairie. Our team works with clients to create a unique design that that will create a cohesive relationship between the home and the garden. We offer personalized designs based upon the individual’s taste, style, and budget. And all of our work is done to meet my obsessive nature. Read more > Search and view over 500 plants zoned for New Orleans Download a PDF of our Plant List for New Orleans Climate Read what our clients have to say.
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New Orleans Garden Design

It doesn’t get any more “Old South” than growing mint for juleps in your garden. That’s what oilman Glenn Smith and wife Judy do in the orderly yet vibrant gardens surrounding their new home in The Woodlands, a suburb of Houston. The Creole-influenced French Colonial home and outbuildings were designed by Ken Tate of Covington, Louisiana. His name is synonymous with the high and hospitable style of the Old South. “I wanted it to feel as if you were transported back in time,” says Judy, an adept hostess who uses her own little courtyard and garden off the sunroom to create menus for parties that spill from house to grounds, often including poolside dining. More than a dozen tall French doors provide a casually elegant transition to the outdoors, and most windows afford views of the rolling emerald grounds. Transoms are left open in warm weather, when the fragrance of gardenias–that emblem of Southern gentility–imbues the air. When the Smiths, long smitten with Louisiana style (they also own a small home in the New Orleans French Quarter), decided to build in Houston, their horticultural designer, Helen Grivich, suggested architect Tate. “I had admired his books on architecture because I love the old Southern style,” Judy recalls. “So we went to New Orleans to see homes he had designed, and they were just magnificent.” “Glenn’s a wildcatter oilman, and they like to take risks,” Tate deadpans. The intuitive, poetry-loving architect says the grounds drove the design of the home, which appears to have been added onto over time. The property looks surprisingly natural in a modern planned community where, Glenn chuckles, they had to get a dispensation in order to set one outbuilding just “two inches” over a designated line. Grivich, who specializes in water conservation and organic gardening, and who explains that she worked closely with Tate, says, “I designed from the outside in, covering the brick walls with vines. Inside the walls, it’s both structured and lush, with parterres and boxwood edging, creating what I call ‘ordered chaos’–nice, trim little edges that surround looser, more flowing plantings. I used all the different flowers and colors that Judy loves and the order that Glenn likes. I like a little whimsy in the middle–I think a garden should make you smile!” An entry gate with an air of mystery, an imposing fountain with water lilies and frogs, a brick overhang on the back porch, antique wrought-iron furniture, and four tall, exquisitely gnarled crape myrtles give the garden its lazily sensuous French Quarter vibe. Sequential plantings create the illusion of separate seasons in mostly hot Houston, balancing native plants with tropical ones. The grounds feature a wealth of trees–yew, magnolia, lime, lemon, and pomegranate. Camellias, larkspur, snapdragons, roses, hydrangeas, irises, and bird-of-paradise are among the profusion of plants and flowers. “Deer and climate dictated what to plant,” Grivich says. “I spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to make the inside look tropical, because Houston has colder winters than New Orleans.” Intriguing outbuildings include two pigeonniers (French for dovecotes), one serving as a children’s playhouse with Lilliputian-height ceilings and its own wee garden, the other as a gentlemen’s cigar bar. The pigeonniers were Tate’s idea: “I needed architecture out there in that circular drive of the compound, something that referenced–but didn’t echo–the architecture of the house.” This time of year, 14,000 tulips in a spectrum of undulating colors carpet the grounds. In the spring, lovely deer-resistant larkspur creates what Grivich calls “a huge canvas that’s completely blue, like a Monet painting.” Despite such floral operatics, the approach to the property is quietly graceful, planted with deer-resistant alyssum and dianthus. Set on the 18th hole of a golf course, the home is cloistered on three sides by courtyard walls made of vintage brick as tendriled with vines as Rapunzel’s tower. “It’s pretty low-profile,” Glenn says. “We’re not trying to announce ourselves to any passersby.” Tate finds his way into his designs through fictional narratives, an idea that enchants former English teacher Judy. The story here is that in the ’20s, the scion of an old New Orleans family ventured to Texas. Nostalgic for home, he built a dwelling in the piney woods outside Houston that eventually became “a beautiful architectural relic that can barely be glimpsed through a dense screen of trees.” “We wanted a friendly home where everything seems used and comfortable,” Judy says, “and that’s just what we got.”
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New Orleans Garden Design

New Orleans is often called Crescent City, The Big Easy and The City Care Forgot, but to me, it’s The Land of A Thousand Magical Courtyards. Whether they’re tucked behind tiny restaurants or hidden down the cobblestone paths of huge antebellum homes, courtyards can be found from the Garden District to the French Quarter and in outlying areas where tourists rarely roam. No two are alike, but they’re all lush, leafy, full of fountains, found objects and somehow beautifully manicured and messy at the same time. My heart lives in New Orleans, but the rest of my body lives in Southern California. Since I can be (or bead) with the ones I love this Mardi Gras, I chatted about courtyards with Beverly Katz, a landscape designer and owner of Exterior Design, Inc. Turns out, replicating a New Orleans courtyard is like making a great gumbo: one part texture, two parts flavor and heaping helpings of history. According to Katz, the New Orleans courtyard we know and love today is the result of fires that nearly destroyed the city in the late 18th century. “As citizens planned to rebuild, they had to consider the new and higher taxes on land, so they built taller on a smaller parcel,” she says. “Homes were closer together and without sprawling green space, so homeowners walled off their small outdoor spaces to provide both privacy and fire protection—and added ornamental foliage, fountains and décor for a charming effect.”
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New Orleans Garden Design

All Professionals / New Orleans Metro Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers clear all 213 New Orleans Landscape Architects and DesignersProfessional landscaping anchors a house to the site, connects it with the environment and creates a welcoming entrance to a home. A landscape architect or designer works with living plants as well as building materials to design for future growth and maintenance as well as the present visual appeal. Landscape architecture is very regional, so look for a landscape designer in New Orleans that’s familiar with the local climate and plant types that do well there. Start here to learn more about the landscaping services in New Orleans that will help create your dream garden. More
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New Orleans Garden Design

Mary Cooper’s New Orleans GardenIn her New Orleans garden, Mary Cooper has achieved lushness with very little and abundance on an extremely small scale. Vince Dooley’s GardenUniversity of Georgia’s famed football coach is passionate about two things: football and gardening. In our Q & A, he talks about his biggest gardening challenge. Edibles at the Atlanta Botanical Garden Responding to its constituents’ obsession with local and sustainable food, the Atlanta Botanical Garden transformed a former parking lot into an edible garden with cutting-edge style.

New Orleans Garden Design

New Orleans Garden Design
New Orleans Garden Design