Haskins Garden Furniture

Haskins Garden Furniture

THERE is one sector of the retailing world where family businesses still loom large. That is the garden centre business, where somehow national brands have not succeeded in dominating the independents. Julian Winfield, chief executive of Ferndown-based Haskins Garden Centres, recently became chairman of the Garden Centre Association. “A lot of garden centres are owned by families, although there are some bigger groups,” he says. “The Garden Centre Association has been going for 50 years and we’ve got about 80 members across the country. “We’ve been members for a long time but one of the benefits is that we’ve all learned from each other, grown up together and stimulated each other. “Our main competitor to our site here is Stewarts but over the years we’ve been friendly to Stewarts and known them through the association.” The reason family businesses continue to succeed is that they are able to take a longer view than the companies focused on year-on-year targets, he says. “I’ve been in the business 23 years and there are a lot of staff here who have been here a long time,” he says. “In terms of making investments, it’s perhaps that being family owned businesses, we tend to take a longer term view.” Without a longer-term view, Haskins would not have invested in the restaurants which are a huge part of its business, he says. “Our restaurants are very busy. They’re over 20 per cent of our turnover and they help us when the weather’s not as good,” he adds. Haskins has four garden centres – at Ferndown, Southampton Snowhill and Roundstone, the latter two in West Sussex. It is looking for a fifth site. It employs 600 people, including 205 at its garden centre and headquarters in Ferndown, and is a £31million business. The name Haskins has been connected with horticulture since 1882, when Harry Haskins founded a nursery in Poole. His great-grandson Warren Haskins took over the nursery business when he was 20, following the death of his father. In those days, the business employed seven people, but Warren Haskins opened a retail shop which grew into the garden centre business. He remains non-executive chairman. The business has been at its 10-acre site at Longham, Ferndown, since 1994, and gave it an extensive refurbishment in 2008. “We’d like to find a couple more sites. We’re looking at sites within three hours of Bournemouth. We’ve been looking for a few years without success but we’re determined what when we do it will be right for us. There’s no pressure to do it,” says Mr Winfield. “It’s a complex business where you’ve got to push forward in as many different areas as you can in terms of developing property and expanding the business, making sure it’s efficient as well as having a good culture where people feel they can thrive. “Our family ownership is important to us, our family values, the quality of our product, our people, which is not just our staff but our customers, making sure we’re listening to and trying to help them as much as possible – and having the sustainability in business, ensuring we look after the environment as much as we can and making sure we’re able to invest in our customer experience.”
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Haskins Garden Furniture

The name Haskins has been connected with horticulture since 1882, when Harry Haskins founded a nursery in Poole. His great-grandson Warren Haskins took over the nursery business when he was 20, following the death of his father.
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Haskins Garden Furniture

Haskins Garden Centre celebrates successful staff and makes 33 promotionshaskins.co.ukIn the last year, Haskins Garden Centre has promoted 33 of its employees working at its centres across Dorset, Hampshire and West Sussex. The staff, totalling more than five per centre of the…
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Haskins Garden Furniture

Gardiner Haskins Special Offers Discover our range of special offers in all departments at Gardiner Haskins. These offers are only in store, so come in to make the most of them. Our offers change regularly, so keep checking back for the latest.
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Haskins Garden Furniture

Haskins serves a community need. Good parking in Longham so the Jag with the Panama hat on the back shelf can be parked conveniently and also the day trip for the retirees can accommodate the coaches as they all pile in for their cuppa in the restaurant. What’s the problem? Ferndown is a good spot for them, lots of retired people with lots of private pensions, big houses, money to spend. They have time to spend in the Longham traffic jams. In fact it’s going to get even better with all the new development nearby. Soon the Bluebird site will succumb and people will be able to walk from there and the new site at Holmwood to save queuing for an hour from the Angel or Longham bridge to spend their money at Haskins.
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Haskins Garden Furniture

6 Straight StBroad Plain – off Temple WayBristol BS2 0JPUnited Kingdom +44 117 929 2288 This place is really hard to define. Is it a hardware store? A garden centre? A department store? A pharmacy? A Christmas shop? A kitchenware shop? A sandwich shop? An off licence? Answer – yes. Divided into two separate buildings, with a large onsite car park you will be surprised what you can find in this place. Set over a number of floors you'll find clothes, bikes, books, toiletries, electronics, gardenware, furniture, chocolate and sweets. They've also got an impressive selection of ciders, ales, wines and liquers. Think mead, orange flavour beer and ginger wine. All the drinks you struggle to find in supermarkets. Other people here have mentioned the hardware store on one side (they mix Dulux paint which is very handy by the way) but I just want to mention the garden centre which is on the separate building across the pedestrian/cycle path (which reminds me – do note the different coloured bricks and cycle images on the floor and watch out for cycles). The garden centre is pretty well stocked for peripherals, but also has a nice selection of instant colour seasonal plants as well as some fruit and herbs for kitchen gardens. Their willows and topiary are a bit old fashioned and I would recommend going to a specialist nursery for trees (try Chew Valley Trees) but this is great for a gardening hit in town. An iconic building across the landscape of the flatter Temple Meads/Dings industrial area, the outside is most certainly more impressive than the inside. Gardiner Haskins is basically a big hardware and everything else store, which is now somewhat out of date. If you're looking for drill bits or saws this is a great place to go, where the staff know their stock from head to toe, but it's not the place you'd go for stylish home ware. I guess it could be said that it is what it is: A sensible home department store serving quality to items to the people of Bristol. This sprawling department store feels like one giant throwback to the 1970s. The design is dowdy, come here after going to Ikea for a real shock. You'll hear very British muzak plays over the speakers, interrupted occasionally by an announce who kindly reminds you to validate your parking when paying for your goods. Quaint to the point of being weird, and also almost always completely empty. Enough of analysis of the style of the shop, I should probably tell you if it's any good. There are sections for homeware and DIY, as well as a garden centre. You can get more or less anything for the home, a few things you didn't know you needed, and a few things no-one would ever need. There's an entire row of various things for your milkman to leave the milk in, to give you an idea of the range. It's not that cheap unfortunately. I think all there costs must go on the staff (who are very helpful), of which there seem to be a greater number than there are customers most of the time. A great hulking oddity of a shop, like something from the seventies, sits at the back of temple meads in an old brick warehouse. I went there to buy a single torch and came out laden with things I didn't need – a rather attractive rug, some value children's books, a pot plant and several bottles of discounted shampoo. This is the kind of weird selection they sell – useful, but extremely confusing! It's open long, long hours and there really isn'y anything like it anymore – a dinosaur of a hardware shop that refuses to compromise. Melanie is right to refer to this shop as a dinosaur. It's a relic of another age and a wonderful one at that. You feel like you're stepping back in time the moment you enter through its hallowed doors and hear the announcements over the intercom and the muzak. It sells all kinds of things from industrial workwear and bike accessories to an amazing craft supplies section, Dulux paints and a bargain basement of incredible value toiletries and booze. Then there is floor upon floor of furniture and across the street a huge garden centre stocking great value bedding plants and shrubs and a huge range of garden furniture. One of my favourite things though has to be the table of cheap seasonal chocs they sell off at incredible prices just after Christmas/ Easter has passed.

Haskins Garden Furniture

Haskins Garden Furniture